away come away

never trust an outliner

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The other day I stumbled across a link, something along the lines of 25 ways to torment your characters, and in idly perusing this list I realised that one of the reasons I'm struggling with momentum on the faerie novel is because the characters' wants, needs and fears have evolved as part of the plot […]

the wages of honey

two months down? already?

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I'm behind in my blogging (as usual), and partly that's because I'm this close to wrapping up the thorn girls short story. I am tempted to indulge in the cliche so close I can taste it, but really that would only be attractive if finishing were, say, a peanut butter sandwich. With fresh white bread. […]

journal

i am this close to declaring to-do-list bankruptcy

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Since the old routine was proving difficult to groove back into, post-Mongolia, I've been trying out a new routine. It's not quite working yet. Previously I'd been landing early at the dayjob, and writing after I clocked off. This has the benefit of my morning tram not being a peak hour one, and the library, […]

journal

writing is such a chaotic sport

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Justine Musk (who always has amazingly clever things to say on the topic of wordsmithery) talks about outlining, and why outlines change: This is what took me way too long (and three published novels) to figure out about plot: Plot is a process. …the outline informs the novel but the growing novel also informs the […]

journal

seagull singing status: not yet

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So far, the proofs have taught me three things (or at least, three things which come immediately to mind). First, a "brace" is a pair of something. Did you all know this? I did not. I was in fact under the impression that it denoted decidedly more than two. Dear proof-reader, thank you for questioning. […]

it's all about the whimsy

and they're all (well, mostly all) cousins

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The proofs for Shadow Bound landed today. The fourteen-day forecast is therefore for sudden squalls of insanity, the occasional seagull impersonation, an inability to discuss any topic that does not immediately relate to (for example) the placement of commas, and a general air of abstraction and sleeplessness. Although, the proof reader has won my undying […]