broken vs flawed

In case you read my blog but don't read hers: Elizabeth Bear on the difference between 'flawed' and 'broken'.

what's your quirk?

Agent Nephele Tempest muses about voice: So, what's your writing style? You should know, and keep track as it evolves. Agents and editors talk about voice a lot, and the truth is that we're talking about two different things at the same time: what your writing tone and style are, and what your narrator or […]

and the angels will weep for you

Today, all I want to do is watch Garden State. Sadly, I do not have a copy of it handy, and so looks like I'll be thwarted in that want yet another day. Also today, after an hour and a half spent fighting for words during which I spectacularly achieved zero, count them zero, I […]

letter from kelly link

Kelly Link, resident editor at the OWW, has written a letter to workshop members, which Charlie has posted at his blog. The only kind of critique that I worry about, in the long run, is the tendency of a workshop to sand off all the interesting edges from a writer.

that, that and which

Glenda Larke has started a Sunday Writing Tips feature on her blog. Last week she focussed on the perils of the word "that". This week, she's explaining the difference between "that" and "which".

outlining, damselfly-style. (with footnotes.)

I don't talk about my writing process overly much, or with a great deal of specificity when I do — mainly because every time I contemplate the topic, I always trip over the "what (barely, if at all) works for me won't necessarily work for anyone else" hurdle; and if I manage to make it […]

ONE DAY I WILL HAVE TIME FOR EVERYTHING. EVEN YOU. ESPECIALLY YOU.

So the short story currently stands at 12,000+ words. And thus the short story is not short at all, particularly given the fact that there are great, enormous gaping holes all throughout the narrative. And thus the short story, in addition to not being short, is not actually a story (yet) either. (Two criteria, and […]

writing is such a chaotic sport

Justine Musk (who always has amazingly clever things to say on the topic of wordsmithery) talks about outlining, and why outlines change: This is what took me way too long (and three published novels) to figure out about plot: Plot is a process. …the outline informs the novel but the growing novel also informs the […]